Whether they are for the purpose of recruiting, coaching or managing performance, competency models are intricate and complex processes to develop and implement. And as director, manager or CEO of a company that employs HR professionals, you may not view these tools as cost-efficient.

Yet, when used correctly, the proof of their efficiency stems beyond simply having narrowed down the right candidates for the job. Employees selected via carefully developed and customized competency models have the potential to become what field experts call “bar raisers”.

We have the proof in this week’s HR pudding.

A culture of stars selecting stars

In a recent Wall Street article, Amazon received some rather interesting press for having coveted the culture of bar-raising practices, and sticking to it. But just what do bar raisers do?

“Bar raisers are skilled evaluators who, while holding full-time jobs at the company in a range of departments, play a crucial role in the hiring process by interviewing job candidates in other parts of the company.”

In light of this definition, let’s revisit the title of this article: What if your bar raisers – those employees who go far and beyond their job description, with outstanding results – had a say in your recruiting talent management process?

Imagine that! Creating a business culture through which your star employees are empowered and trusted to select new stars. It’s certainly not mere luck that the process of recruiting and selecting the right candidates or developing employee performance could then lead to their initiation into that of a bar raiser. And yes, it all begins with developing and implementing the right competency models for your organization.

The foundation for performance

When used during the recruiting process, competency models have proven effective in identifying certain behaviors that could affect the welfare of other individuals or groups within an organization. Because they extend beyond the typical technical requirements for a given position, behavioral repertoires, such as motive and various personality traits, offer a better means of predicting an employee’s success within your company.

Knowing that, who better placed than your bar raisers to determine which competency or behavior benefits and which harms your group’s productivity as a whole? Imagine hav