Use Competency Interview Guides to Conduct Structured Event Interviews

The Premise:
Past behavior is the best predictor of future performance. People have unique and characteristic ways of dealing with work situations. As a result, they develop preferred ways of operating. Because of these preferences, they develop particular abilities and become competent in their use. Some of these preferences, abilities and competencies are significant in predicting job success. People do—in the course of describing experiences and accomplishments—offer valuable information to adequately discern their preferences, abilities and competencies.

A competency-based interviewing protocol can be used to assess the competencies (skills, knowledge, and personal characteristics) of a candidate that have been determined to be required for superior or effective performance in a job. These competencies are usually identified through job competency modeling. Interview guides can provide an easy-to-follow format for structured, behavioral-based interviews. Each Workitect interview guide, with specific questions related to each of  thirty-five competencies in Workitect’s competency dictionary, makes it easy for a hiring manager or interviewer to collect behavioral examples about a candidate’s relevant work experiences and accomplishments. These interview guides can be used with other generic competency dictionaries or lists of competencies. Most of the Workitect competencies (definitions and behavioral indicators) are similar to non-Workitect competencies. For example, most competency dictionaries include a competency similar to Interpersonal Effectiveness and Fostering Teamwork. 

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Related Reading

Blueprint: Competency-Based Assessment and Selection    
Blog: Six Steps to Conducting a Behavioral Event Interview
Website page: Competency-Based Assessment and Selection
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The Purpose

Interview guides are designed to assist in the behavioral interview process. They provide specific questions and probes for the behaviors of a competency. In addition, positive and negative behavioral indicators are listed that will help evaluate the candidate’s responses. While the process described below is designed for multiple interviewers seeing each candidate, it can be completed with only one interviewer.

What is included in a Guide

An interview guide is available for each of the competencies in the Workitect Competency Library/Dictionary . Each guide contains a cover page with tips for conducting an effective interview with a candidate by including “What to Do”:

  1. Prior to the Interview
  2. During the Interview
  3. Following the Interview

Each interview guide then provides the competency definition and behaviors associated with the competency, followed by potential behavioral-based questions and probes for the competency. In addition, positive and negative behavioral indicators are listed to help the interviewer evaluate the candidate’s responses. Finally, the guides provide for space for the interviewer to take notes and provide an overall rating of the candidate.

Selecting Competencies for the Interview

If you have identified competencies for the job being interviewed for using the Workitect Competency Dictionary, determine which competencies you want to assess in the interview process. Usually, only a subset of the total number of competencies for a job is used in an interview – the most critical. There are two “schools of thought” when it comes to which competencies each interviewer assesses. Each interviewer can assess different competencies or multiple interviewers can assess same competencies. The decision depends on how many interviewers there are, how many competencies will be assessed for in the interview, and the preference of the organization.

If you have not identified competencies for the job being interviewed for, look at the key roles and responsibilities of the job (i.e. job description) and identify the critical requirements to the success of the job. Then, using the Workitect Competency Dictionary or another generic dictionary, select those competencies that best match up with those critical requirements based on the definition of the competency and its behaviors.

Conducting the Interview

Prior to the interview:
  • Review the candidate’s resume.
  • Review the assigned the competency(s) and the behaviors that comprise each competency.
  • Select the specific questions you feel comfortable asking each candidate. Note: Not all the questions need to be used – select at least two questions.

During the interview:

  • Greet the candidate and spend a few minutes building rapport; talk about areas the candidate is interested in.
  • Transition into the formal interview.
  • Ask the selected questions and use follow-up probes to get complete examples of the:
    • Situation that the candidate encountered;
    • Actions that the candidate took;
    • Results or outcome of the actions taken.
  • Give the candidate time to think about past examples/experiences when answering the questions.
  • Ideally get at least 2-3 examples for each question.
  • Use the guide to take notes and evaluate the candidate.

Following the interview:

  • Check off appropriate behavioral indicators and summarize key observations and notes. Rate the candidate on each assigned competencies in the space provided at the bottom of each page.
  • Note any observations for competencies not assigned and be prepared to discuss.
  • After completing, interviewers should meet to discuss and reach consensus on the final ratings for each candidate and complete the Candidate Interview Summary.
  • Make the hiring decision.

DOWNLOAD AN INTERVIEW GUIDE FOR THE COMPETENCY OF “INITIATIVE”.

Learn more about Competency Interview Guides for 35 competencies.

Structured Event Interviews are also used to collect data in step 3 of Workitect’s competency modeling process, as taught in the Workitect Building Competency Models workshop.

Ed Cripe is President of Workitect, Inc., the leader in the development of job competency models and competency-based talent management applications.

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Interviewing and Assessing “Strategic Thinking” Competence

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What is a Strategic Thinking Competency?

Definition: Analyzing an organization’s competitive position and developing a clear and compelling vision of what the organization needs for success in the future.

 Behaviors:

  1. Understands the organizations strengths and weaknesses as compared to competitors
  2. Understands the industry, market and product/service trends affecting the organization’s competitiveness
  3. Develops distinctive strategies to achieve and sustain competitive advantage; translates strategies into clear goals and objectives
  4. Communicates a clear vision that energizes others to accomplish what the organization needs for success in the long term; consistently restates and reinforces that vision and direction
  5. Focuses on ways to build the organization’s capabilities for the future

Using a Competency Interview Guide

Download the complete interview guide for Strategic Thinking.

Use a Competency Interview Guide to assist in the behavioral interviewing process. It provides specific questions and probes for the behaviors of the competency. In addition, positive and negative behavioral indicators are listed that will help evaluate the candidate’s responses. While the process described below is designed for multiple interviewers seeing each candidate, it can be completed with only one interviewer.

Prior to the interview:

  • Review the candidate’s resume.
  • Review the assigned the competency(s) and the behaviors that comprise each competency.
  • Select the specific questions you feel comfortable asking each candidate. Note: Not all the questions need to be used – select at least two questions.

During the interview:

  • Greet the candidate and spend a few minutes building rapport; talk about areas the candidate is interested in.
  • Transition into the formal interview.
  • Ask the selected questions and use follow-up probes to get complete examples of the:
    • Situation that the candidate encountered;
    • Actions that the candidate took;
    • Results or outcome of the actions taken.
  • Give the candidate time to think about past examples/experiences when answering the questions.
  • Ideally get at least 2-3 examples for each question.
  • Use this guide to take notes and evaluate the candidate.

Following the interview:

  • Check off appropriate behavioral indicators and summarize key observations and notes. Rate the candidate on each assigned competencies in the space provided at the bottom of each page.
  • Note any observations for competencies not assigned and be prepared to discuss.
  • After completing, interviewers should meet to discuss and reach consensus on the final ratings for each candidate and complete the Candidate Interview Summary.
  • Make the hiring decision.

Examples of Behavioral Questions and Probes

1a. Think about the organization you work for now. What are some strengths and  weaknesses of the organization as compared to its competitors?
1b. What industry and market trends are affecting the organization’s competitiveness?

2. Think about a product or service provided by your organization. What are some specific competitive strengths and weaknesses of that product or service within the marketplace?

3. Give me an example of a time when a product or service you were offering was not as competitive as it should be. How did you know this and what did you do about it?
What was the situation? What action(s) did you take? What was the result?

4. Give me an example of when a product or service you were offering was one of the best in the marketplace. How did you know this and did you do anything to keep it the best?

  • What was the situation? What action(s) did you take? What was the result?

Download the complete interview guide for Strategic Thinking.

Learn more about Competency Interview Guides for 35 competencies.

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Do your executives and managers need a Global Perspective?

Twitter1252X626_WorldTo maintain global competitiveness, changing circumstances are demanding global strategic visions and new organizational structures that are conceptualized, articulated and implemented by managers.

What is a “global perspective”?

It is the ability to recognize and address issues that are outside of our national perspective. Issues are viewed without any pre-set biases or limitations. It requires being objective, and utilizing a broad framework in making judgments in domestic and international activities. It is an ability to see the “big picture”.

A person demonstrating this competency:

  1. Has global experience: considers problems and opportunities from a global perspective
  2. Understands group strategy, the role of the local business: “walks the talk”
  3. Is culturally aware and demonstrates ability to conduct business in local terms
  4. Understands and takes into account global and local impacts on day-to-day activities
  5. Aligns global strategy and tactics with local considerations
  6. Keeps abreast of global influences on the local business
  7. Role models for staff on global initiatives
  8. Aligns and manages local interests with global considerations
  9. Is proactive – prepares locally to support global activities
  10. Is empathetic and sensitive to global issues, but may lack international experience

General Considerations in Developing this Competency

In order to develop this competency, one must first set aside any and all negative, preconceived notions, biases, and ideas. This will allow the individual to fully understand and appreciate the inherent differences that exist within all cultures. Once this is done, the individual should begin to acquire information and knowledge about other cultures, in an effort to conceptualize the mores, norms, values and business practices of those given cultures.

Practicing this Competency

Acquire as much knowledge as possible through various media sources, such as the internet, periodicals, and television. Immerse yourself in different cultures by traveling, or joining groups and/or organizations with a variety of cultures. When given the chance, listen to other people’s experiences and viewpoints as they pertain to a specific cultural group, then experience this same group and see in your experience what was similar or dissimilar.

Obtaining Feedback

Ask persons from different cultures how knowledgeable you seem in regards to different geo-social, geo-economic, and geo-political issues. This will be your best gauge to assess your progress.

Learning from Experts

Identify people within your organization who are from other cultures. Discuss both business and social topics with them. See things from their perspective. Look for differences in the way they would handle and interpret different situations. Ask experts in international business to help you understand the interaction between world events, global business and your business. Spend time with natives of foreign countries, discussing the differences and similarities of your respective backgrounds.

Coaching Suggestions for Managers

If you are coaching someone who is trying to develop this competency, you can:

  • Assign the person to work on projects with others from diverse backgrounds, countries and cultures. Build in international travel, where possible. Provide pre and post project briefings and debriefings regarding cultural opportunities and pitfalls.
  • Help the person develop a proactive plan for developing a global perspective.
  • Give the person feedback on his/her behaviors and performances where there was an opportunity for the demonstration of a global perspective.

 Sample Development Goals

By July 1, I will attend a meeting of the local World Trade Organization or international chamber of commerce – to learn and network.

By end of the third quarter, I will complete a Spanish (or other foreign language) class.

By the end of this month, I will subscribe to and read The Economist on a regular basis.

Each week, I will read about and/or learn about a different culture. This may include going to lunch with someone from a country/culture different from mine.

Resources for Developing this Competency
Resources for developing this competency, including books, workshops, courses, and e-learning programs, are listed in Workitect’s COMPETENCY DEVELOPMENT GUIDE, which includes similar information for the additional thirty-four competencies that are contained in Workitect’s COMPETENCY DICTIONARY.

Questions for conducting a structured behavioral event interview in order to assess and select for this competency are included in a set of thirty-five COMPETENCY INTERVIEW GUIDES.

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Selecting a HR Application for a model-building project

Competencies 4-c [Converted]Competency models have many potential uses – for diverse areas including selection, assessment, development, performance management, training, and planning career paths. Some organizations do not always feel a need to have an initial application in mind when building a competency model. To some, competency models are a novelty, and they want to build one first, and only afterwards think about how to apply it in the organization.

Too often, organizations build a competency model but never get around to applying it. And a competency model alone provides little value to anyone. It is essential to have a particular Human Resources (HR) application in mind when building a model and build the implementation of that application into the initial project plan. It is a important component of Workitect’s Worksheet for Planning a Competency Modeling Project and Building Competency Models workshop.

There are three important reasons for doing this:

1) The nature of the intended HR application can shape the data collection and analysis. For example, in a project to construct a competency model for sales professionals, the competency model would need to be incorporated into a sales training program. Since the training program was to be built around the selling process, it was important to understand how the selling process worked for different types of projects. A day- long resource panel focused on defining the sales processes for both simple and complex sales situations. When the competencies were identified, they were linked to steps in the two sales processes.

2) The planned HR application can shape the format of the model, especially its behavioral descriptors. For example, if the model will be used by managers to assess jobholders’ demonstration of the competencies, as part of a performance appraisal, it is important to include behavioral descriptors of less effective behaviors as well as effective ones.

3) To ensure that money and other resources will be available for the application. If the initial application is not part of the budget for the model building project, there is a chance that financial support will no longer be available when the competency model has been completed. The organization receives little benefit from its investment, until the model is applied in a way that enhances productivity.

Read more in “Seven Key Questions to Answer before Building Competency Models”.

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Develop Results-Driven Leaders

Results-Driven TeamResults Orientation is a competency that is defined as focusing on the desired end result of one’s own or one’s unit’s work; setting challenging goals, focusing effort on the goals, and meeting or exceeding them. A person demonstrating this competency:

  1. Develops challenging but achievable goals
  2. Develops clear goals for meetings and projects
  3. Maintains commitment to goals, in the face of obstacles and frustrations
  4. Finds or creates ways to measure performance against goals
  5. Exerts unusual effort over time, to achieve a goal
  6. Has a strong sense of urgency about solving problems and getting work done

Importance of this Competency

Results Orientation enables an individual to set and achieve challenging goals. People with this competency keep their goals and performance measures firmly in mind, so that they accomplish more in a shorter period of time. This competency is also an advantage after downsizing, because staff of a leaner organization must accomplish more work and become more productive.

General Considerations in Developing this Competency

One of the best ways to develop this competency is to work closely with a manager or team leader who demonstrates it. These people set challenging but achievable goals and milestones, regularly checking their progress against goals. They also demonstrate a sense of urgency about achieving goals. You may also find it helpful to read one of our guides that address goal setting. In addition to the ideas below, examine the time management readings and listed under Analytical Thinking in Workitect’s Competency Development Guide.

Practicing this Competency

  • Prepare a set of personal work-related goals for the next two weeks. List what you will do in specific terms.
  • The next time you are in charge of a meeting, prepare an agenda that includes specific objectives. Keep the group on track to ensure that you meet all objectives for the meeting.
  • Find ways to measure your own work or a team’s work. First identify the most important outcomes you are working toward with each key task. Develop a way to measure each key outcome. For example, if you are in a Sales group, you might measure number of cold calls, number of customer meetings, number of proposals, and number of sales closed per week. Once you have identified the measures, graph each measure to track trends over time. For example, one graph might plot number of customer meetings held per week.
  • If you are on a team, push the team to identify specific goals with deadlines and specific team members accountable for their completion.

Obtaining Feedback

Prepare a set of goals for your own work or for a team of which you are a part. Show the goals to someone whose judgment you respect. Ask if the goals represent the right balance between being challenging and being achievable. A good set of goals should be challenging enough to provide positive motivation and realistic enough to be achievable with some extra effort.

Learning from Experts

Interview someone who has achieved impressive results. Ask this person what he/she does to achieve results. Ask the person to describe in detail what he/she did to achieve one or two impressive results. Ask about planning, setting goals, and dealing with obstacles.

Coaching Suggestions for Managers

If you are coaching someone who is trying to develop this competency, you can:

  • Model this competency by publicly setting challenging but achievable goals for your unit.
  • Ask the person to prepare a set of personal work-related goals for the next 3-6 months. Review the goals with this person and provide feedback and suggestions. Set up a procedure for the person to regularly meet with you or keep you informed about progress toward the goals.
  • Provide assignments which involve having the person work closely with someone who is strong in Results Orientation

Sample Development Goals

– By January 16, I will prepare a set of personal work-related goals for the first quarter and review these goals with my manager.

– By February 1, I will develop 3-6 key measures of my work progress. I will plot each of these measures on a graph displayed in my cubicle.

– By March 4, I will ensure that the Distribution Reassessment Team has developed a set of goals for the second quarter and an action plan with specific tasks, milestones, and accountabilities.

– By June 30, the team will meet all of its goals.

Resources

Books

Getting Results: Five Absolutes for High Performance, by Clinton Longenecker & Jack L. Simonetti. New York, NY: Jossey-Bass, 2001.

Goals and Goal Setting, Third Edition: Achieving Measured Objectives, by Larrie Rouillard. Menlo Park, CA: Crisp Publications, Inc., 2002.

Performance Management: Changing Behavior that Drives Organizational Effectiveness, by Aubrey Daniels & James Daniels. Tucker, GA: Performance Management Publications, 2004.

Process Reengineering in Action: A Practical Guide to Achieving Breakthrough Results, by Richard Y. Chang. New York, NY: Jossey-Bass, 2000.

Root Cause Analysis: Improving Performance for Bottom-Line Results, Third Edition, by Robert J. Latino & Kenneth Latino. Boca Raton, FL: CRC Press, 2006.

The Answer to How Is Yes: Acting On What Matters, by Peter Block. San Francisco, CA: Berrett-Koehler Publishers, Inc., 2002.

The Seven Habits of Highly Effective People, by Stephen Covey. New York, NY: Simon & Schuster Ltd., 2005.

Your Brain at Work: Strategies for Overcoming Distraction, Regaining Focus, and Working Smarter All Day Long, by David Rock. New York, NY: HarperCollins Publishing, 2009.

 

External Courses

Building Better Work Relationships: New Techniques for Results-oriented Communication. Three days. American Management Association. Tel. 877 566-9441.http://www.amanet.org/training/seminars/Building-Better-Work-Relationships-New-Techniques-for-Results-oriented-Communication.aspx

Getting Results Without Authority. Three days. American Management Association. Tel. 877 566-9441.

The Fundamentals of Structural Thinking. Four days. Robert Fritz, Inc. Tel. 800 848-9700.

Directory of Resource Providers

This same level of information is available for 34 additional competencies that are a part of Workitect’s Competency Dictionary. Workitect helps individuals and organizations to develop competencies and competency models. We customize guides and provide licenses for the use of development guides throughout an organization. Contact us to learn more about the range of tools we provide. 

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“How to Do HR Right” – FastCompany

Several years ago, the business magazine FastCompany published an article written by Keith Hammonds, titled “Why We Hate HR”.  It was posted in a previous Workitect blog, “Why Do Some Executives Hate HR?”  Most of the article describes where HR falls short in being an effective contributor to business results. The article also includes a list of five suggestions for improving the effectiveness of the human resource function.

Say the Right Thing. At the grand level, what HR tells employees has to match what the company actually believes; empty rhetoric only breeds discontent. And when it comes to the details of pay and benefits, explain clearly what’s being done and why. For example, asks consultant Dennis Ackley, “When you have a big deductible, do employees understand you’re focusing on big costs? Or do they just think HR is being annoying?”

Measure the Right Thing. Human resources isn’t taken seriously by top management because it can’t demonstrate its impact on the business. Statistics on hiring, turnover, and training measure activity but not value. So devise measurements that consider impact: When you trained people, did they learn anything that made them better workers? And connect that data to business-performance indicators-such as customer loyalty, quality, employee-replacement costs, and, ultimately, profitability.

Get rid of the “Social Workers.” After Libby Sartain arrived as chief people officer at Yahoo, she moved several HR staffers out–some because they didn’t have the right functional skills, but mostly because “they were stuck in the old-school way of doing things.” Human resources shouldn’t be about cutting costs, but it is all about business. The people who work there need to be both technically competent and sophisticated about the company’s strategy, competitors, and customers.

Serve the Business. Human-resources staffers walk a fine line: Employees see them as stooges for management, and management views them as annoying do-gooders representing employees. But “the best employee advocates are the ones who are concerned with advancing organizational and individual performance,” says Anthony Rucci of Cardinal Health. Represent management with integrity and honesty-and back employees in the name of improving the company’s capability.

 Make Value, Not Activity. University of Michigan professor Dave Ulrich, coauthor of The HR Value Proposition (Harvard Business School Press, 2005), says HR folks must create value for four groups: They need to foster competence and commitment among employees, develop the capabilities that allow managers to execute on strategy, help build relationships with customers, and create confidence among investors in the future value of the firm.

Related Reading: Teaching Guide for “Why We Hate HR” published by SHRM, “Why We (Shouldn’t) Hate HR”, HBR by Bill Taylor, June, 2010.

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Google’s approach to competency-based talent management

imagesOver the years, there has been much ink spilled over the recruiting practices at Google. The company is now very well known for having successfully implemented a talent management strategy that permeates all levels of the organization — from top executives to entry-level employees – and attracts the very best talent on the market.

Even in its early stages, the company understood the importance of engagement and motivation as performance drivers and competitive advantages. But building engagement and retaining top talent is no easy feat. Many organizations continue to believe that compensation and benefits are key to achieving these goals; yet, there is a new generation on the marketplace and while affording a certain lifestyle is certainly important to them, it is far from being the main criteria for selecting an employer, much less exhibiting superior performance in their job.

A Forbes article explains how, decades ago, Google decided to give every employee 10-15% free time to work on pet projects. Not financial incentives, but the opportunity to show their skills and work on projects of interest of them. This ties in nicely with McClelland’s need theory, which claims that humans possess three main needs, or motives – Achievement, Affiliation and Power – each of which dictate specific behaviors in the workplace.

Capitalizing on the achievement motive as a primary driver, employees used this free time to come up with new business ideas and projects, thereby supporting the organization’s growth, innovative competitiveness and overall success.

This talent-focused culture for which Google is now known is, of course, funded today by a budget that very few companies have the privilege to manipulate. Yet, Google’s success (with respect to talent management) isn’t entirely the result of large HR investments.

Let’s take a closer look.

A culture of competency

Google has long understood that it needs skilled, driven and innovative bar-raisers to outperform its competition and to that end, has managed to change the way its employees work in order to build a culture that attracts and retains the very best.

Forbes’ mini case study reveals that to support this new culture, Google goes through a process of identifying critical positions in the organization – those very job roles where performance can differentiate them from their competitors – and emphasizing the search for top performers in these roles. Not for every job function in the organization, but for positions that make a difference in Google’s environment.

But finding top performers, even if only for a handful of roles, is easier said than done. After all, there is really no way of knowing if a person is “right” for the job unless they get a fair chance at proving it. At the very best, an employee may have demonstrated certain skills in a given role, under a specific scope of constraints and responsibilities, but a true top performer is developed with the idea that motivation is key to raising the bar.

For Google, this meant allowing employees to work, one day a week, on projects of interest to them, a strategy that not only motivated employees to prove their skills and demonstrate the extent of their contributions to Google’s success, but also allowed the company to remain on the cutting edge of the competition as a result.

Of course, we are not implying that this “pet project” solution can work for any organization, particularly if your company is struggling with an inadequate workforce-to-workload ratio. What we are saying however is that you need to identify the key roles in your organization, along with the competencies (skills, behaviors, knowledge, interests, motives, etc.) required to perform in these jobs, and then provide your employees the latitude and flexibility they need to outperform.

For optimal results, think clarity and transparency

Defining competencies is key to executing your company’s strategy and reaching your long-range goals. But the essential first step consists in establishing clear directions, and ensuring that your strategic directions are communicated to your workforce. Transparency is the only way to gain the support of your employees, and build a coherent team that works toward achieving the same objectives.

Top performers who seek to put their skills to use for your company’s success can only show you what they can accomplish if you allow them to understand your goals and participate in the process of getting there. Getting your bar-raisers to the table is a critical part of creating a truly high-performing and motivating culture because without transparency, even your best employee will resolve to only doing what is required of them. That is exactly what Google managed to avoid by granting employees the chance to actively participate in idea generation and process creation activities.

The result of this effort is an integrated workforce and human resource systems that promote and reward talent and outperformance, not to mention enhanced accountability and innovation. And while the bottom-line benefits include increased productivity and higher profits, the true value of a competency-based approach to talent management is a lot more powerful.

Implementing a transparent, competency-based approach will renew your company, uncovering startling energy and synergies that can give you the responsive, competitive edge you need. But you first need to know which competencies are needed to take you to this next level. And that’s what competency modeling aims to accomplish.

The following white paper presents all the benefits of this system, along with the steps to move forward.

We also invite you to browse our blog for many more articles on applying a competency-based talent management system to various HR applications within your organization.

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The Cost of Higher Quality Decision-Making

How do successful human resource teams manage to do more with less, thus earning their respective title? Less staff, less outsourcing… all thanks to higher quality decision-making, which drives lower costs. Sounds easy enough, right? It doesn’t have to be complicated.

Here’s a little insight to how having an integrated talent management approach can help manage costs and promote resiliency.

Foster resiliency, foster freedom

We all ideally want to achieve that sense of purpose in our careers – after all, our “job” is simply an aspect of identity, while our “career” serves as an aspect of our lives. When the concept of resiliency is fostered by the HR function, both parties (HR and employees) are provided the freedom to make choices and act on them, thus allowing everyone involved to feel ‘in control’ of their professional life. This, in turn, assists in boosting productivity and overall performance.

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Some tips for promoting resiliency include:

  • Engaging employees via communication regarding the influence they hold in daily tasks and their career paths.
  • Re-framing stress into opportunities for growth & development (i.e., incentives).
  • Cultivating creativity by involving employees in the process of any organizational change.

Research has shown that the more an individual views their job as a calling rather than simply a set of tasks, the more committed they are in the workplace. By fostering resiliency and applying tips, such as those mentioned in the above bullet points, you allow your employees to adopt a sense of freedom and true purpose – and a better chance they will stick around in the face of high-stress situations or corporate change.

Sharing a common language

Along with cultivating a resilient staff, successful HR organizations understand how to remain focused on the business’s objectives in order to effectively identify the skills needed for the job, both present day and well into the future.

Before adopting a talent management program, it’s important to recognize what it means for the HR function to ‘share a common language’. An integrated talent management system shares a communicative architecture, contrasting from a typical system where:

1)     Selection decisions are made via one set of criteria

2)     Performance is appraised on a second set of criteria

3)     The training function teaches a third set of skills

Using a more integrated approach, for example a selection decision, is based on the understanding of not only on how employees should be identified, but how their skills align with the company’s vision and culture.

To learn how you can begin taking the first steps to successfully do more with less by fostering resiliency and building an effectively integrated talent management system, please visit our webpage.

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Better Hiring, Less Firing

Interview iStock_000019777981_SmallHiring employees is one of the most crucial decisions an organization or business owner will make. Compensation certainly is a large expenditure, especially when an employee ends up not being the right candidate for the job. That’s why it’s important that before hiring, no matter how pressing the need, you take a step back and ask yourself: “Are my hiring practices hurting our bottom line?”

Competencies guiding the way

Consider this: People have unique and characteristic ways of dealing with life situations – work and personal. This fact gives to a preferred way of operating where certain abilities become competent in their everyday lives. These abilities and competencies are quite significant in determining individual job success.

With the use of a competency-based interview guide that is focused on specific behavioral questions, you can truly gain a sense of a prospective employee’s personality, as well as whether or not they are the right hire for the job.

There are many factors to consider when hiring employees, including:

  • The fit with your company’s culture
  • The level of enthusiasm about your vision
  • The attitude and willingness to learn new things
  • The career goals of the individual (do they want this job or are they looking for a transition?)

These traits are, of course, not all that matters, and that’s why it’s crucial to have a competency model for each position; to ensure that your hiring process is cost effective and adapted to each role.

The foundation for performance

When used during the HR selection process, competencies have also proven effective in identifying certain behaviors required for a job that would affect the welfare of other individuals or groups within an organization. These behavioral repertoires, such as motive and personality traits, offer a better means of predicting occupational success.

Employees are both a challenging and expensive investment, but hiring the right employees the first time can make all the difference.

To learn more about how you can build a solid competency-based system for employee assessment and selection, please visit our website.

Also, for a more in-depth discussion on the cost of a wrong hire, check out our blog archive: The Cost of a Wrong Hire: Competencies to the Rescue.

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Competency-Based Succession Planning

Businessmen Listening to a Female Ceo Talking in a Meeting RoomFor most employees, the potential to access other, oft-higher positions within an organization is a great incentive to maximizing performance. As an HR professional, it is therefore important that you maintain this motivation and invest in their development through adequate training and coaching. It is equally essential to properly assess employees’ current skills as well as potential for growth.

To do so, there are several “intangibles” to evaluate to determine if an employee can succeed in a new role, typically requiring a new set of competencies. Yet, how does the human resource function attain transparency – the knowledge of what exactly those intangibles are?

In comparing an employee’s performance and potential, a competency model can provide a consistent, objective and valid framework. Once designed, not only such a blueprint benefit your employees by providing them with a “reset button” – that is, a continued opportunity to fulfill career aspirations, but it can also save an organization thousands of dollars in turnover expenses by simply reusing the current employee within a more desired, or better suited, role.

A Measuring Stick for Retaining Optimal Performers

With defining job competencies in succession planning, it’s all about ensuring the right individual is placed in the right job at the right time. However, like many things in life, it is not a perfect science and employees reserve the right to perhaps either change their mind or simply wish to advance differently within an organization.

With the right competency model (i.e., suited to your reality and needs), your organization is equipped with a solid measuring stick for evaluating those previously mentioned employee intangibles, and can therefore help ensure certain desired outcomes, such as:

  • Few people fail
  • One, preferably two, well-suited internal candidates are qualified for each key position
  • Few superior performers leave because of lack of opportunity

The result: A well-prepared, high-performing HR team, an organization that retains optimal performers who already grasp the internal corporate culture, processes and procedures, and employees who are motivated to succeed in making a difference for the company, much thanks to their own individual growth potential.

To learn more, please visit our webpage on Competency-based Career and Succession Planning.

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